Bone Broth Protein Drink- I never knew it was so healthy

Bone Broth 4

Bone Broth

As a child growing up, my Nan and Dad would always boil any leftover bones from a Sunday roast. We would often invite my Grandparents for Sunday lunch and my Dad would always give my Nan the bones to take home with her. My Nan made the broth and then would use it in soups and stews for the next few days. When my Nan passed away my Dad started to do the same as he was then left with the bones.

Both Nan and Dad didn’t like food waste. Nan lived through the war and she was also an orphan at a very young age. My Dad was a small boy when the war began and both lived on rations. When both Nan and Dad made broth with the bones I don’t think they realised just how many health benefits it has for the body. I think they felt it was a good way to make a meal go further.

In recent months I have been discovering the advantages of not only using broth in food, but also drinking it as a protein drink. Many grandmothers around the world would make broth with the leftover bones. A big bowl of steaming chicken soup isn’t just good for the soul. There are reasons why our grandmothers prescribe it when you’re feeling under the weather.

Bone broth is nutrient dense, easy to digest, rich in flavour and boosts healing. Years ago our ancestors would make stock from the bones as a way to eat every part of the animal. Lions and tigers, when they go on the hunt and catch the prey they want to eat, will always attack the bones first. They instinctively know the benefits they gain from eating the bones. The bones, feet, skin, ligaments and tendons that we as humans can’t eat can be slow cooked. The process of simmering the bones helps to release healing compounds like collagen, proline and glycine that help to heal the body.

Broth has minerals in forms that can easily be absorbed into your body. The fact is that there are a dozen different nutrients found within bone broth, many of which can’t be obtained easily from other commonly eaten foods. My Nan and Dad are no longer here to ask if they knew about the benefits of eating broth. Although, I’m sure if I asked my Nan she would be excited by this news. Dad, on the other hand,  would probably have told a little white lie and said yes. I think he did this to sound intelligent and occasionally it worked even on his own family.

So broth has amazing benefits for everyone. Even if it’s the only food you cook then just have a go at making this recipe below. I promise, if you add this to your meals or just drink it like a cup of tea or coffee, you won’t be disappointed. Plus the recipe is simple and easy to do. I make the first batch in the slow cooker overnight so it feels like the fairies have made it. Investing in a slow cooker is also a great way to make stock too. It means I don’t have to be standing at a stove for a few hours and I still get delicious results. It saves me time and that is another added bonus. Well worth a try.

Equipment needed

Bone Broth 1

Bone Broth

  • Sharp knife
  • Chopping board
  • Slowcooker
  • Jug
  • Ladle
  • Colander
  • Pudding tins and/or zip tie bags
  • Teaspoon

Ingredients

  • Bones of any animal
  • Leek x 1 large
  • Carrots x 2
  • Celery x 2 sticks
  • Tomatoes x 2 large
  • Garlic x 2 cloves
  • Peppercorns x 6 – 8
  • Salt x 1 tsp
  • Water x 5 litres

Method

  • If the bones are not cooked, preheat the oven to 200°C and place them on a baking tray for 30 minutes.
  • Once they are cooked they will add more flavour.
  • Meanwhile, or to begin with, roughly chop the leek, carrots and celery into large chunks and then quarter the tomatoes.
  • Next place the bones in the slow cooker along with the chopped vegetables.
  • Add the garlic cloves, whole peppercorns, salt and half the water.
  • Set the slow cooker on a low heat and leave for around 8 -10 hours.
  • When you have finished cooking the broth, remove the lid and leave to cool.
  • Once cooled, take your jug, put the colander on top and remove the liquid with the ladle, straining it as you go.
  • Make sure you use a jug or two big enough to hold all of the liquid.
  • Finally, when all the liquid has been strained and the bones have been removed, put all the ingredients in the colander back into the slow cooker.
  • Add the remaining water and cook the bones again.
  • Put the slow cooker on for 8 – 10 hours on a low heat.
  • When the first batch has cooled completely put in the fridge overnight.
  • In the morning there should be a layer of fat that has formed on the top on the stock.
  • You can save the fat and use it to cook with.
  • I put mine in a small glass jar.
  • Once the fat has been removed, pour the liquid into zip tie bags or a tupperware box and freeze.
  • Repeat the same process with the second batch.
  • Remove when you need to use stock in a recipe.

Bone Broth protein drink. Serves 1

Equipment needed

  • Mug or cup
  • Saucepan
  • Stirring spoon
  • Teaspoon

Ingredients

  • Bone broth x 1 cup
  • Yeast extract x 1 tsp

Method

  • Measure one mug or cup of bone broth.
  • Pour into the sauce pan.
  • Put on a medium heat and bring it to the boil.
  • Once simmering add in the yeast extract and stir while it melts.
  • Pour back into the mug or cup and drink and enjoy.

Bone Broth can be used in many different dishes and can be drunk like tea. In our house we enjoy it in curries, spaghetti bolognese, soup and stews. Plus it also makes a delicious gravy to eat with a roast dinner or can simply be enjoyed on it’s own. It will keep in the freezer for up to six months but my stock normally only lasts a couple of weeks. My husband and son love a chilli or spaghetti bolognese made with bone broth. I hate to coin the phrase but they really can taste the difference. However you decide to eat this dish, as always, enjoy. xxx

Do you make bone broth and if so what interesting ways do you use it to cook with. Let me know and please don’t forget to like and follow me. xxx